Lovely Workout Routine Tips From LovelySkin

Workout partners
Exercise is good for your body, but can be hard on skin. Shower smart to make sure gym germs don’t live beyond your workout.

Starting the new year with fitness resolutions? Good for you! Bodies that move more and routinely work up a sweat are healthier than their sedentary counterparts. Plus, working out just feels better than sitting still. Embrace your new workout routine, and maximize its benefits with one easy cleansing tip. Read on to get the scoop.

Stay Healthy at the Gym

Gyms and health clubs are great places for fulfilling fitness resolutions, but can be breeding grounds for some pretty icky bacteria, after all. Read more about that here.  The good news is that proper cleansing is usually all it takes to make sure that gym germs don’t become big-time skin infections like Staph, ringworm, athlete’s foot or, worst of all, MRSA.

CLn SportWash Belongs In Your Gym Bag

We at CLn Skin Care were thrilled when one of our retail partners, LovelySkin, published a blog post with top cool-down tips for workouts and included CLn SportWash into their workout routine.

CLn Sport Wash can be used head-to-toe, and is tough on microbes but gentle on skin. It has no added fragrances, dyes or parabens and is easy to toss in gym bags. It takes less than two minutes to use, which might just make it the most efficient part of your workout routine.

Cleansing is one of the healthiest things you can do after a workout. Add CLn to your cool-down routine and look forward to a healthy, happy year.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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Could You Be Unknowingly Slathering Animal Fat on Your Face?

January is the month of fresh starts. We cleanse, detox, write resolutions and sign up for Pilates memberships. In this time of heightened selfcare, we also owe it to ourselves to examine WHAT we are putting on our bodies. So, CLn Skin Care’s blog will devote all of our posts in the month of January to making helpful, healthy suggestions for selfcare. To begin our series, we’re diving into the skin care product  ingredients you could be using everyday without being aware they are animal-derived.

Understanding Skin Care Ingredients

Read ingredients carefully if you’re trying to avoid animal products in your skincare routine.

For skin conscious shoppers with strong convictions about animal-based products, it can be challenging to interpret every word on the back of a bottle. The labels “cruelty-free,” “animal-friendly,” and “vegan” are helpful, but decoding the rest of the list isn’t always as straightforward. So, the first step to understanding skin care product contents is educating yourself on what miracle ingredients are animal, plant, or synthetic-based.

Common Animal-based Skin Care Ingredients

Although the following ingredients may have a familiar ring, you might not know their origin. If the choice to utilize only vegan products is best for you, look for these ingredients on the label. And keep shopping for alternatives if you see them listed!

Tallow

Bovine ingredients are used in many skin care products.

Rendered from animal fat, tallow is a popular solution for repairing broken down skin cells. It is found in moisturizers and other cosmetics and is a source of omega 3’s, vitamin C, and vitamin E.

Collagen
Often thought of as the ultimate anti-aging ingredient, collagen is a protein extracted from animal tissue. You’ll see collagen listed on moisturizers and lip-plumping glosses.

Retinol
Also an anti-aging ingredient, retinol is bursting with vitamin A. It is commonly extracted from fish and animal products. Look for it listed on face and eye creams.

Lanolin
A super hydrating product, lanolin is the purified sebum excreted from wool-producing animals. You can find it in products ranging from nursing balms to skin creams to shampoos.

Plant-based Alternatives

If you’re hoping to avoid animal-based ingredients in your skin care products, rule out any product containing the above ingredients. Instead, look for plant-based ceramides.

What are ceramides? They’re the waxy lipid molecules that occur naturally in your skin and in many other living things. In other words, they’re the glue protecting your skin from unwanted microorganisms and helping it to retain moisture. Over time, your skin can lose natural lipids in many ways–age, drying products, and other environmental factors. This is where moisturizers containing plant-based or synthetic ceramides come in.

Ceramides in Moisturizers

Not all ceramides are plant or synthetic based, but those used in CLn Facial Moisturizer are.

The ceramides used in CLn Facial Moisturizer are a unique concentrate consisting of a mixture of skin-identical long-chain ceramides and short-chain ceramides, vegetable-based cholesterol and behenic acid also from a vegetable base. Using advanced technology, the ceramide building blocks (phytosphingosine and sphingosine) are produced by a fermentative process, which yields the skin-identical ceramide stereochemistry.
For your reference, the table below lists the plant & synthetic-based ceramides used in our products, and in many other products as well:

1. Ceramide NP: vegetable/microbial
2. Ceramide NS: vegetable/microbial
3. Ceramide EOS: vegetable/synthetic/microbial
4. Ceramide EOP: vegetable/synthetic/microbial
5. Ceramide AP: vegetable/synthetic/microbial

How we make choices about the products we use is intricately tied to our own personal values. Although animal-based products can be effective, they don’t fall within selfcare guidelines for some people. Jamie Lyons, a Dallas stylist, explains her decision to only use vegan products. “…So much of what you put on your skin is absorbed into your body. If I’m taking steps to make sure my diet is free from animal products and anything else that contains chemicals, toxins, and preservatives, then I need to make sure the products I’m using are free of these things as well. Ethically, I love that by purchasing vegan products, I’m not supporting animal testing or cruelty.”

CLn Skin Care is happy to be among the list of brands providing effective plant and synthetic-based products to our customers. And we never test on animals. We wish everyone a very healthy, happy New Year. Stay tuned to our blog for more healthy topics in January.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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Acne Tips for Athletes

Sweat + Friction combine to create acne in basketball players
Acne is common in basketball players

Social media has changed the way we view sports. Monday morning quarterbacking has been replaced with real-time commentary across Twitter, Facebook and forums. Fans—and haters—constantly comment on everything from bad plays, to opinions on uniforms, to athletes’ acne.

Kevin Durant, a 29-year-old player for the Golden State Warriors, is often critiqued on social media for his skin, for example. In September of this year, he replied to a thread of comments on YouTube:

Fan: “Who cares what people think. Just do you. Someone of stature shouldn’t worry about stuff like that.”

Durant: “of my stature, I play basketball, I got acne, I grew up with nothing…still figuring myself out in my late 20[s]…I’m closer to you than u think.”

Durant mentions acne, a skin condition many basketball players seem to suffer from. It is a hard condition to conceal, especially on a jumbotron or high definition TV. Jerald Sklar, M.D. is a Dermatologist in Private Practice in Dallas, Texas and treats athletes’ acne, including basketball players from the high school level all the way up to the pros. He serves as Team Dermatologist for the Dallas Mavericks, and explains acne in this way: “Acne begins when oil released from glands in the pores mixes with dead skin cells and clogs and inflames the skin’s pores. This can be exacerbated in basketball by excessive sweating, staying in sweaty clothes too long, and friction from clothing and headbands.”

Dr. Sklar is spot-on. So let’s break down his intel in order to have a look at why a player like Durant (even with all the resources available to him) still deals with acne.

How Acne Begins for Athletes

Testosterone & Overactive Oil Glands

The last time we wrote about acne, we focused on teens and their struggles. The same acne equation applies to young male athletes:

Overactive oil glands + skin cells = clogged pores

With the addition of an overproduction of testosterone, acne is almost a certainty.

Sweat, Sweat & More Sweat

Basketball players run about 2.5 miles per game, not to mention the rest of the physical exertion in the sport. All of this work means a whole lot of sweat, which allows acne bacteria to multiply.

Uniform & Headband Friction

Acne mechanica is a unique form of acne that is most common amongst athletes. The culprit? Friction. A headband or uniform traps heat and sweat against the skin, causing a hair follicle blockage, and clogged pores result.

A Close Shave

Shaving the face, chest, arms and legs can reduce uncomfortable friction and keep a player cool, but it also increases the risk for acne. A close shave may feel smooth, but folliculitis can soon to follow.

Player to Player

Basketball isn’t a full-on contact sport, but when contact occurs, it is typically skin-to-skin. The transfer of bacteria between players can make an existing acne problem worse, or can lead to new skin conditions.

No Time for Blotting

Basketball is a fast action sport and players have little downtime on the bench. Wiping sweat away from the eyes with the back of the hand may seem intuitive and easy, but blotting it away—not rubbing—with a towel is better for the skin.

Acne Tips for Athletes

Keep Clothes Clean & Dry

Wash uniforms, socks, sweatbands and everything else every time you practice or play. Make sure all items are dried thoroughly.

Try to Reduce Friction

As mentioned above, try to blot—not wipe—sweat away. If uniforms are creating friction, consider wearing a base layer underneath (if permitted).

Don’t Forget to Sanitize Your Razor

As mentioned above, shaving can contribute to folliculitis, which often looks like acne. Clean your skin before shaving, and don’t forget to sanitize your razor. Tricia Holderman, a specialist in infection prevention and control was recently  quoted by GQ , offering this advice: “Cleaning your razor with alcohol or hydrogen peroxide will kill most germs. Doing this for short periods frequently will kill the germs without damaging the metallic finishes of the razor’s holder and handles.” Clean razors=fewer germs entering your skin while shaving.

 Shower Right Away

NBA players might have to conduct interviews right after a game. For all other basketball players, hitting the showers immediately after a game is the best way to stop acne-causing bacteria.

Use CLn SportWash Daily

Our head-to-toe wash was designed by physicians to combat all the skin-related issues athletes face–including acne, back acne, razor bumps, folliculitis, ringworm, jock itch and body & foot odor. Shower right after exercise, massaging the product into skin, hair and nails for 2 minutes. Then rinse with lukewarm water.

Whether or not you find yourself on a screen with millions of fans commenting on your every move (or pimple), a healthy routine and the right products will help you target bacteria and reduce the spread of acne.

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Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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What They Don’t Teach at the Makeup Counter – Makeup Guidelines

Keep your makeup clean to keep your face healthy and gorgeous

If I ask myself when the last time I went through my makeup bag was, the answer is, “too long ago.” I know cosmetics have shelf lives, just like many products. So why don’t I purge them more often? I thought long and hard about it, and decided that—for me, at least—the answer lies in the role makeup plays.

In my life, cosmetics live somewhere between skincare and fashion accessories. The products that are more like skincare–products I use every day that are part of my routine–I tend to use, run out, and replenish. The products that are more like fashion accessories–seasonal lipstick shades or the eye shadow bought for a specific dress–tend to take up drawer space for years if I’m not careful. So, as I prep for a big purge, I did some research on make-up guidelines. Let my research inspire you!

Shelf-Life Guidelines

Foundation: 6 months – 1 Year

The general rule of thumb is that powder foundation lasts longer than liquid. If you use powder, keep your brush clean with CLn SportWash or CLn BodyWash. (Read more on brush cleansing later in this post.) If you use liquid, pour the product onto the back of your hand or a brush for application. Keep the rim of the bottle clean.

Lipstick & Gloss: 1 Year

To make the product last longer, store it in a cool, dry place (even on the move). If you notice a change in texture or smell, it’s time to toss out that gorgeous shade.

Eye Pencils: 1 Year

As you sharpen your pencil, remember to clean your sharpener. Rubbing alcohol or hydrogen peroxide can work germ-killing wonders with a little soak time.

Mascara & Liquid Liner: 3 Months

These liquid products tend to dry out and clump up, requiring frequent replacement.  They also come in close contact with your sensitive eyes. Set a calendar reminder to replace these products regularly. Toss right away if you notice a change in odor or have had a cold or eye infection.

Blush: 6 months – 2 Years

Like all liquid products, replace liquid blush with more regularity. Powder blushes last a long time with proper hygiene, but shouldn’t be kept for longer than 2 years. Same goes for bronzers or powder contouring sets.

Eye Shadow: 3 – 6 Months

Even if you use powder shadow, you’ll want to replace this product regularly since it is placed directly above your eyes. Also consider using disposable applicators or brushes that can be washed frequently.

Other Ways to Keep Your Makeup Routine Clean

Apply Makeup on a Clean Face with Clean Hands

Before you apply anything to your face, start with a clean slate. CLn Facial Cleanser won’t bleach clothes or towels, and is tough on microbes but gentle on skin. When you apply makeup to a clean face, you’re less likely to pass bacteria back to your products. Win!

Wash Your Brushes Every 1-2 Weeks

Add a dime-sized amount CLn SportWash or CLn BodyWash to a cup of water, and mix. Wet your brushes in the solution and massage thoroughly into the bristles and handles of your brushes for at least 60 seconds. Pat the excess water out with a clean towel, reshape the brush heads, then leave in a well-ventilated area until completely dry. Tip: don’t lay your brushes on a towel to avoid mildew.

Don’t Share

Makeup is fun. But catching an infection from someone else is not. We all have our own individual microbiome (microorganisms specific to a particular environment) and they are best not shared. Everything from Staph to Herpes can be transmitted via makeup. Keep this in mind at the makeup counter, too. Watch carefully to see how products are sanitized before they are applied to your gorgeous face!

I hope these tips help you as much as they are going to help me. I love my makeup, but a big purge + cleansing is on my to-do list for this evening.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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Healthy Scalp Tips for All Hair Types

Flakes? Bumps? Itching? Odor? What do these 4 things have in common? They are all very prevalent issues of the scalp. So, this month, CLn® Skin Care is breaking down what causes each of these issues, and what you can do to manage them. Because bald can be beautiful, pixie cuts can be glam and long, flowing locks can be luscious. But scalp issues are never, ever pretty.

Flaking—The Causes

Dandruff: Many people use the term “dandruff” to describe all flakes. But dandruff, or seborrheic dermatitis, is just one cause of flakes. Dandruff is very common and is almost always more embarrassing than it is harmful.

Eczema and psoriasis: Both conditions can cause cell build-up or scaly patches on the scalp. Scratching can worsen the appearance, not to mention lead to open cuts.

Infrequent washing: Dry shampoos can work miracles on busy mornings, but skip one too many real shampoo sessions, and cell buildup can result. Shampooing hair and scalps (even if bald) removes excess oils and dead skin cells, and is recommended at least every few days for anyone suffering from flaking.

Dry, cold weather: Arid, chilly air can deplete moisture from any area of the body, including scalps. Cold weather is often to blame if flaking occurs only when the temperatures dip and/or humidity levels decline.

Hot showers or heat styling: High temps can disrupt your skin’s barrier, including your scalp. Excessive heat not only dries out skin, but can also cause your body to overcompensate by ramping up oil production.

Bumps—The Causes

Folliculitis: According to dermatologist Jerald Sklar, MD, “Folliculitis is infection or inflammation in the hair follicle or in an open pore of the skin.” Scalps contain 10s of thousands of follicles and pores, so chances are, you’ll end up with a bump or two from time to time.

Barber’s Itch: Have a shaved head or close-cropped hair, and also bumps? You could be suffering from Barber’s Itch. Also known as Pseudofolliculitis barbae, this condition is caused by coarse and/or curly hairs. According to Mark Jackson, MD, “the curl of the hair can make it difficult for the hair to exit through the follicle opening, thus creating a bump, an ingrown hair and more inflammation. Chronic manipulation, such as shaving or scrubbing, creates worsening of the condition.”

Acne: Acne can appear on the body anywhere that oil + bacteria + dead skin cells combine, and the scalp is no exception. Wearing hats or sweatbands or not showering after working out can increase chances for acne of the scalp. Hairline acne is common, and can be painful.

Itching—The Causes

Dandruff, eczema and psoriasis: It is no coincidence that the same conditions that cause flaking can also cause scalp itching. And the more you scratch, the more flakes you may release.

Infection: Tinea capitis, known as ringworm of the scalp, is a fungal infection that can cause circular, scaly, itchy patches on the scalp. In extreme cases, hair loss may occur in affected areas.

Contact reactions: Many shampoos, conditioners and styling products contain alcohol and fragrances. The immediate result might be shiny, delicious smelling hair, but continued use of irritating ingredients can cause itching, tightness of the scalp and even rashes.

Odor—The Causes

Not washing enough: As previously stated, skipping one too many shampoo sessions can cause scalp problems, including odor. Bacteria on the scalp, when allowed to overgrow, can give off an unpleasant sour or musky odor.

Wearing hats too frequently: Wearing hats—particularly if they are not washed regularly—can trap sweat and oil against the scalp, resulting in stale or unappealing odors.

Open sores: Skin conditions can lead to weeping or oozing sores. If left untreated, these sores and their fluids can give off an unpleasant smell.

Scalp Solutions

Shampoo away dandruff, itching, bumps and odor
Specialized shampoo used a few times a week is an easy way to care for your scalp

As you can tell by now, many scalp issues are interrelated. This is actually good news, because it means just a few simple changes could knock out or prevent several issues at once. Here are our top 5 solutions to keep your shoulders flake-free, your scalp smooth, and your confidence high…

  1. Shampoo the right way: Over-washing with harsh products or shampooing daily may actually dry the scalp, leading to more flaking. Consider using a specialized shampoo and experimenting with the best frequency of application. CLn® Shampoo is a clinically tested, hypo-allergenic formula for normal to oily scalps prone to itching, folliculitis and dandruff. It can be used 1-3 times per week. CLn Gentle Shampoo can be used more frequently for dry hair and scalps. It carries the National Eczema Association seal, and is suitable for scalps prone to eczema and psoriasis.
  2. Clean your razor: Shave your head often? Then change or clean your razor blade often, too. Blades can grow bacteria, which can be introduced to follicles during shave sessions. A 10-30 second dip in rubbing alcohol or peroxide is all it takes, and neither product will damage razors.
  3. Wash hats, headscarves and headbands: Just as washing hair often enough reduces issues, washing items that cover scalps can reduce issues. A good laundering removes sweat, oil and bacteria from your items, keeping them clean for when they come in contact with your scalp.
  4. Keep it cool: Avoid hot showers and try to minimize heat styling. Indoor humidifiers can also help prevent moisture loss from skin and scalps during drier months.
  5. Work with a dermatologist: Don’t dismiss scalp issues like flakes or itching if you think you have a skin condition. Dermatologists are trained to diagnose and treat scalp issues, and many times the solutions are simpler than you’d think!

We hope you found this post helpful. Subscribe (on the right) to get more posts about skin conditions, causes and solutions delivered right to your inbox.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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Expert Answers to Hand Eczema FAQs

 

Peeling and redness are common symptoms of hand eczema
Photo credit: nationaleczema.org

Eczema of the hands can be particularly painful and difficult to manage. Also, sufferers may feel self-conscious or have to refrain from everyday activities during flares. Hand eczema is frequently posted about on Facebook eczema support groups, and is a common source of questions we receive at CLn Skin Care. So, we compiled a list of frequently asked questions about eczema of the hands, and Dr. Mark Jackson provided expert answers:

QUESTION: What causes eczema on the hands?

Eczema simply means dermatitis or dry, red, itchy, irritated skin. It can be caused by things that irritate the skin or by things that cause allergy or contact dermatitis. It is also seen in people with a history of atopic dermatitis, which is a condition where patients don’t have a normal skin barrier and they are not able to use products that people with normal skin can use.

QUESTION: Who suffers from hand eczema more commonly?

Patients with atopic dermatitis or people who are washing their hands constantly or working with harsh, irritating chemicals experience more hand eczema.

QUESTION: What makes hand eczema worse? What ingredients or activities should be avoided by sufferers?

Constant washing/drying without following by moisturizers, exposure to irritating chemicals, winter weather or anything people might be allergic to can cause or worsen an eczema flare.

QUESTION: What ingredients or activities should be avoided by sufferers?

Avoid fragrance-containing cleansers and lotions. Lotions have a higher alcohol content than creams or ointments so they are best  avoided for general moisturizing in patients with severe hand eczema. Also, irritating chemicals like bleach and other caustic agents should be strictly avoided.

QUESTION: What can help manage hand eczema?

Good moisturizing techniques with high quality emollient creams and ointments that are fragrance-free can really help. As can avoiding harsh washes and antibiotic cleansers such as the leave-on hand sanitizers. Soapless liquid cleansers tend to be gentle and get the best result.

QUESTION: What role does cleansing play in managing the condition?

Good cleansing protects from bacterial overgrowth, which is common in the damaged skin of eczema patients.

We hope these answers help you to better manage your hand eczema. We encourage you to use gentle, effective cleansers on your hands whenever and wherever possible, and to seek the care of a dermatologist if your hand eczema worsens.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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A Time for Reflection and Giving Thanks

When we launched CLn Skin Care a few years ago, our mission was to improve people’s lives by inventing easy-to-use, gentle therapeutic cleansers—unlike any other cleanser system on the market. I had had my own health scare. And through it I realized that many more people than myself needed a better way to cleanse compromised skin and skin prone to infection. Our goal at the time felt lofty. We were trying to build and introduce an entirely new product category called “Therapeutic Cleansing.”

Luckily, we were able to partner with a small group of leading edge scientists and dermatologists in the development and testing of CLn products. We created a whole line up of products designed to gently, but effectively, cleanse compromised skin. I will be forever grateful for the collaboration and genius minds that helped make CLn a reality.

We were also fortunate to attract forward thinking doctors to sample CLn products to their patients. Word about our gentle, therapeutic cleansers quickly spread. Soon there was enough demand to begin selling CLn products online. We were not surprised by the reaction, as we knew we were offering something truly valuable and unique. But to see doctors and patients alike rally behind our products filled us with gratitude. It also gave us the motivation to make sure that more doctors and patients discovered how CLn’s line of therapeutic cleansers can truly change lives.

As we reflect on the past few years—and this year, in particular—we are incredibly thankful for the difference CLn is making in people’s lives.

CLn is now:

  • Used in medical settings throughout the US for thousands of patients with compromised or troubled skin
  • Distributed worldwide and recommended to Dr. Aron’s eczema patients
  • Endorsed by team physicians for use by professional athletes needing a cleanser that is tough on microbes and gentle on skin
  • Recognized by the National Eczema Association

We are incredibly proud and grateful for what CLn Skin Care is accomplishing. And we are tremendously thankful for the support we receive from doctors and patients alike. We wish all of you a healthy, happy Thanksgiving.

With gratitude,

Azam  Anwar, MD

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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Traveling with Eczema – The Advanced Guide to Packing

Don’t go “wheels up” without reviewing our detailed plan for traveling with eczema

Getting away is an exciting, welcomed break from the day-to-day. With the holidays just around the corner, travel of some kind lays ahead, whether it’s heading home or off to a sunny resort.

For people who live with eczema, preparing for travel means an entirely different level of organization, planning and calculation for even a simple trip. Getaways come with unfamiliar environments, foods and climates—and precautions must be taken to minimize eczema flares. CLn® Skin Care knows what it is like to travel with eczema, so we’ve assembled tips and a packing list to make trips less stressful for you. Read below for helpful tips, and click through this link for an editable packing list…CLn Travel Checklist

Planning the Destination

Wherever you’re heading, consider the following before you even pack your bags.

Climate

Arid and cold weather can dry out the skin, causing flares or worsening of eczema symptoms. When facing a dry-out, pack heavier creams. To prep for cold weather destinations, visit our post on cold weather tips here.

Medical Treatment

Search for the nearest medical facility and pharmacy and bookmark them for peace of mind.

Food

If certain foods are a trigger for you or your child, use proactive communication. Family members and even hotel restaurants are happy to make accommodations when health is at risk.

Bedding

Ask anyone you are staying with–family members or the hotel staff–to avoid placing decorative pillows and quilts on beds if dust is a trigger. These items are not always washed frequently, and just a little dust can cause a big flare. Also, ask what detergent is used on sheets and towels. Fragrances, fabric softeners and harsh detergents can be a major irritant, and advanced planning is required to head off this potential trip destroyer.

The Carry-On

A good planner prepares for the best and worst scenarios. In this case, the worst could be a lost checked bag. Double check the TSA guidelines before packing your bag and make sure you have all your eczema essentials in a carry-on, just in case.

Pack travel sizes of CLn BodyWash and/or Gentle Shampoo in your carry-on

If you don’t already own travel sizes of CLn BodyWash and CLn Gentle Shampoo, get some empty 3.0 oz bottles at the drugstore and fill them up before you fly! Mystery bar soap is no way to start a trip if you or your littles suffer from eczema.

Creams & RXs

Always keep doctor-prescribed creams and RXs at arm’s reach. Also, airplanes and car heat or A/C can be drying, so pack enough rich cream (in 3.0 oz tubes) to moisturize every few hours throughout the trip.

Change of Clothing

If bags are lost, a clean change of clothes (washed in the right detergent) can make life a lot easier, especially in the case of a spilled drink or layover. And don’t forget to dress in layers. Getting overheated or too cold can trigger eczema flares for many.

The Checked Bag

Traveling smart with eczema often means bringing a lot of extra gear with you. But a better experience is worth the effort. Add these items to your packing list…

Full-sized CLn BodyWash and/or Gentle Shampoo

The last thing you want to happen is to run out of the products that make your life easier. Better to have too much than too little. And remember to use CLn BodyWash in place of hotel soaps, unless you know the soap to be a formula that agrees with your skin.

Linens

If detergents are a trigger, pack two sets of sheets and two-to-four sets of towels. Sure, linens take up room in a suitcase, but at least you’ll feel a little more at home sleeping on your own sheets. Also, if you have young children with eczema, know that the new-ish muslin style baby blankets actually make amazing lightweight towels. They air-dry quickly and take up way less room in a suitcase than terrycloth towels.

Heavy Cardstock and Markers

Everyone loves a handwritten note. When staying in a hotel, place politely written notes reminding the staff not to disturb the towels and sheets you brought with you. All of your diligence can be undone if a dusty comforter is plopped on top of your precious home-laundered sheets.

All Creams and RXs

If you have creams and RXs that don’t meet TSA standards for your carry-on, pack them in your checked bag. If an arid or cold climate is part of the plan, bring heavy-duty products. And don’t forget to fill your doctor in on your travel plans. He or she might prescribe anti-itch creams, antihistamines, wet wraps, etc. if you have experienced severe flares during past travels.

Sunscreen Free of “Stinging” Ingredients

If you’re off to a sunny locale, don’t leave the sunscreen that works for you at home. Chemical sunscreens can contain Avobenzone, which is known to cause stinging. Your dermatologist can also recommend other ingredients to avoid in a sunscreen based on your triggers.

Eczema-friendly Detergent

Following TSA’s guidelines, pack detergent that you can use to wash sheets, towels or even an emergency load of clothes—especially if traveling with kids. No one wants to do laundry on vacation, but a bad eczema flare can weep, kids can be messy, and clean linens are essential for healthy skin.

Eczema Management Plan

If grandparents or aunts and uncles are watching a child with eczema, put together a thorough management plan including when to use certain medications and what foods to avoid. Also note triggers such as environmental allergies, hot temperatures, etc.

After You Arrive

Long flights and car rides can be exhausting. But the last two steps are crucial to starting your trip off right.

Cleanse As Soon As Possible

After being in a crowded public place like an airport, it’s a good idea to cleanse. Use CLn BodyWash for a full two minutes, as it is designed to be tough on microbes, but gentle on skin. Then put on fresh clothes and settle into vacation mode.

Do a “Room Sweep”

Does Grandma have a bowl of dusty potpourri on the dresser? Move it to a high shelf. Does your hotel line the bathroom counter with heavily scented toiletries? Stick ‘em in a drawer. That plush but probably filthy bed cover? Yank it and leave a note saying not to replace it.

The Back Up Plan

Experiencing a flare despite your diligent packing and prep? Don’t hesitate to call your doc. Worst case, you may require antibiotics. Best case, you and your physician may get one step closer to identifying your worst triggers and what to do about them.

Traveling with eczema can be a challenge, but planning goes a long way in minimizing triggers. We hope this packing guide has helped you. We wish you healthy, comfortable journeys!

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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Avoiding the Bench–All You Need to Know About Skin Infections and Wrestling

Skin-to-skin contact between wrestlers contributes to the spread of skin infections

Self-reliance, confidence, strategic thinking, discipline and personal responsibility–these are only a few of the ways wrestling can make your athlete a stronger person. Wrestling also happens to be the most intense skin-to-skin contact sport there is, and it requires honesty, proactive planning and a commitment to healthy hygiene to avoid skin infections.

Of all high school students who deal with skin infections, wrestlers are most affected. As many as 25% of wrestlers will be impacted by an infection during their season. When one athlete on a team contracts a skin infection, there’s a chance the rest of the team will get it, too. This is not only a health risk. Athletes who contract a skin infection face immediate disqualification and a familiar relationship with the bench. That’s no way to spend a season.

If a player contracts a skin infection like herpes, for example, they’ll likely endure fever, sore throat, as well as sores on the skin (most commonly on the head, neck, or face). To get back to competing, athletes have to be symptom-free, show no new sores for 72 hours, and complete antiviral therapy.

Herpes, along with other common wrestling-related skin diseases like ringworm, impetigo, folliculitis, and Staph are all preventable and treatable. The first step is learning how to prevent contraction and spreading.

Start with You

Shower every time you work out with CLn SportWash–our heavyweight wash replaces your usual shower gel and is tough on microbes while being gentle on skin. Consider it an excellent insurance policy.

Keep Clothes and Gear Clean

Don’t forget to throw your gym clothes (and bag) in the wash after a workout. Putting on dirty clothes will erase all the good you do with CLn SportWash. Make sure you clean up after yourself in the gym as well—sanitizing mats and weight room equipment is essential to preventing the spread of infection.

Use Caution

If you have the slightest suspicion that you or a teammate could have a skin infection, err on the side of caution and schedule an appointment with a doctor. You won’t regret catching a problem before it gets worse.

Talk to Your Teammates

This is where honesty comes in. Keeping an open dialogue with your teammates could help spread good hygiene instead of pesky (and untimely) skin infections.

Come Clean

In the case that you do pick up a skin disease, trainers and coaches need to know right away. Sharing the news and taking precautionary measures sooner rather than later could prevent the rest of the team from joining you on the bench.

Clean Some More

Once you’re healed, make sure you wash everything you wore and used while you were infected, including clothes, bed sheets, sports bags and towels.

Wrestling is a tough sport, but skin condition management can be easier with CLn. Subscribe to our blog to the right of this page, as we frequently cover sports-related skin infection topics. And have a healthy, happy wrestling season!

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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Understanding Pseudofolliculitis barbae: An Advanced Course in Folliculitis

Pseudofolliculitis Barbae is common in men of African descent

In the second installment of CLn Skin Care’s blog series on folliculitis, we’re covering Pseudofolliculitis barbae. The condition, also known as “barber’s itch,” can be a lifelong struggle, often resulting in painful bumps. If left untreated, scarring can result. We’ve asked skin expert Mark Jackson, MD to answer frequently asked questions regarding this condition. Read on to learn more.

QUESTION: What is Pseudofolliculitis barbae?

https://forefrontdermatology.com/doctor/j-mark-jackson-md/
Mark Jackson, MD is a practicing dermatologist at Forefront Dermatology

Pseudofolliculitis barbae, or “PB or PFB, is a condition that involves the beard/neck area and occasionally the scalp. It is an inflammation around the hair follicles that causes small bumps that can become irritated and occasionally infected. It also makes it hard to shave or cut the hair in those areas due to the irritation that is present.

QUESTION: What causes Pseudofolliculitis barbae?

PB is caused by coarse and/or curly hairs. The curl of the hair can make it difficult for the hair to exit through the follicle opening, thus creating a bump, an ingrown hair and more inflammation. Chronic manipulation, such as shaving or scrubbing, creates worsening of the condition. While plucking helps remove the hair, it creates another issue as the new hair is unable to get through the opening due to the inflammation that is present.

QUESTION: How does PB impact a sufferer? 

These bumps can be painful, become infected and can create secondary scarring. Sometimes the condition can be so severe that it creates significant scarring and loss of hair in the areas.

QUESTION: How do you treat Pseudofolliculitis barbae?

PB is treated with good hair grooming techniques, and by avoiding plucking or irritating the already inflamed bumps. When shaving or cutting the hair, it is best to leave the length above the skin until the inflammation has resolved, so as not to create another ingrown hair. Topical antibiotics and anti-inflammatory creams or washes can be helpful, as can oral antibiotics in cases where the areas have become infected. Laser hair removal is also helpful as it works at the root cause.

QUESTION: What role does cleansing play in managing the condition?

Proper cleansing techniques help to decrease bacterial overgrowth in the affected area, and to decrease secondary infections. Good cleansers with some antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties also help to control the flares of this chronic condition and to treat active outbreaks. 

 

We hope you’ve found these expert answers on Pseudofolliculitis barbae helpful. CLn Acne Cleanser and CLn Shampoo are both suitable for use with this condition. Don’t forget to subscribe to our blog, as we’ll cover other forms of folliculitis and many more skin conditions in upcoming months.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

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