Top 5 Ways to Find Skin-Friendly Products

When I founded CLn Skin Care several years ago, it was very important to me

that I develop a mild, well-tolerated cleanser that was also effective. I’d just suffered from a skin infection myself, and I found many products to be very irritating. So, I sought the advice and partnership of renowned physicians, dermatologists and scientists to create my patented, gentle, but clinically proven line of skin cleansers. I learned a great deal about what makes a product suitable for sensitive skin. I also learned about finding other non-irritating skin care products.

Read on to discover how to avoid and deal with common skin irritants.

1. Avoid SLS

SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate) is a common additive to skin care products. It helps create lather and is inexpensive. Many manufacturers use it in shampoos, body washes, etc. SLS can sting or irritate sensitive skin, however. CLn cleansers contain Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES), which is believed to be less irritating to the skin than SLS.

 2. Look for Product Testing Results

Many skin products—if they are not classified as “drugs”—have not been thoroughly vetted. In fact, the FDA only requires testing on color additives in cosmetics, and nothing else. Some personal care items contain drying alcohols or preservatives (such as parabens) that can actually cause skin irritation. So always look for a product’s research results. And be wary of big claims not backed by evidence.

We at CLn Skin Care believe in science for both developing and testing products. CLn BodyWash, our flagship product, has been reviewed and analyzed by a luminary board of medical advisors. We have also performed 2 Clinical Studies in children with moderate-to-severe eczema. The studies found that CLn BodyWash is non-irritating and safe for use in children 6+ months. And although CLn is not tear-free, we have tested to ensure that, if exposed to eyes, CLn can simply be rinsed out with no ill effects.

3. Make Sure Your Product is Highly Recommended

Treating skin conditions can be frustrating, result in unwanted side effects, or be downright counterproductive if the wrong product is used. New products pop up faster than they can even be proven. This leads consumers to question how they know if a product is the “real deal.” Looking at ratings and reviews can help. Also, analyze a product’s credentials. CLn Skin Care is recommended by over 6,000 doctors in the US and by international dermatologists such as Dr. Richard Aron. Dr. Aron added CLn products to his Aron Regimen to combat Staph bacteria and also as a way to reduce his regimen’s use of antibiotics. CLn has been used by tens of thousands of patients with essentially no or minimal issues of irritation reported.

4. Know What to do if Your Skin is Easily Irritated

All products—even water, actually—can sting skin that is already irritated, broken or compromised. Always discuss skin irritation with your doctor to rule out obvious causes and to minimize discomfort. And if irritation seems to happen regularly, consider keeping a journal of products used and outcomes so that your doctor can suggest products to avoid. You might want to consider allergy tests, too. Follow your doctor’s advice on dealing with skin that is already irritated. And when using products in the shower, make sure that skin is thoroughly wet before applying, and rinse off thoroughly to minimize irritation.

5. Minimize Risk when Trying New Products

Skin is a complicated organ. And no two people have the exact same skincare routine success. As noted above, products vary in quality and safety and can contain irritants. If shopping for new skin care products, look atSkin friendly Skin Care productsreturn/exchange information. More credible companies will offer free returns or exchanges—which you can usually take as a sign that they believe in their product. Keep your receipts and make a note of return/exchange windows.

We hope this primer on skin care irritant avoidance has helped you. Feel free to reach out to us with skin care questions.  And don’t forget to subscribe to our blog (on the right) to get skin care tips and alerts delivered to your inbox.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

Ready to Head Outdoors? Your Guide for Spring Skin is Here.

Parents and especially for kids can feel like winter lasts for an eternity. Once

Spring Skincare for kids
Spring is a glorious season, but any seasonal change can trigger skin conditions

we’ve had our fill of the snow, holidays and cuddling by the fire, we longingly look out the window. We imagine warmer days when everyone can enjoy the sun and space to run free.

Even with all the anticipation and excitement, parents know the seasonal transition also comes with new challenges. Sun, dirt, sweat, pollens, and knee scrapes mean lots of preparation and care. To help ease you into a sunnier season, we’ve put together a Spring Skin Care Guide to protect you and yours.

Spring Skin Care Guide

Choose the Right Sunscreen

Before you run outside to soak in that Vitamin D, choose a mild sunscreen specifically designed for kids to protect your child’s skin from burning, drying or blistering. WebMD offers excellent advice on why it is so essential to choose sunscreen designed for kids: “The sensitive skin of babies and children is easily irritated by chemicals in adult sunscreens, so avoid sunscreens with para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and benzophenones like dioxybenzone, oxybenzone, or sulisobenzone. Children’s sunscreens use ingredients less likely to irritate the skin, such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Unlike chemical ingredients, these protect babies’ skin without being absorbed.”

Watch for Gardening-related Rashes

Kids can learn many lessons in the garden from watching seeds grow into delicious vegetables or beautiful plants. Unfortunately, pesky plants and microbes that cause rashes and breakouts also dwell in gardens. Kids and adults alike should always wear gloves and thoroughly cleanse hands, arms, and faces after gardening.

Shower After Fun in the Sandbox

There isn’t much you can do to make playtime in the sandbox a clean activity. In addition to the literal mess of gritty particles, sandboxes are truly filthy. Slate.com famously captured parents’ disdain for sandboxes in an article titled, “Sandboxes are Disgusting.” But kids are drawn to them, most parks and preschools have them, and telling your child not to go in them is like telling a fish not to swim.

So…to mitigate those disgusting germs, you should wipe down hands and feet with Wet Ones or similar wipes immediately after playing in a sandbox. Then haul your kid home for a bath. Use an effective cleanser like CLn BodyWash , which is tough on microbes, but gentle on skin. And since it can be used on babies 6+ months, it is the perfect after-sandbox cleanser to make the experience a little less gross for the whole family.

Be Prepared for Seasonal Skin Changes Such As…

Eczema Flares

If your child lives with eczema and seasonal allergies are a trigger, be prepared

Spring Skincare
Pollen can cause eczema flares

with your toolkit when Spring arrives. As the flowers bloom and pollens blow in the wind, it’s time to utilize the eczema-safe skin products and doctor-prescribed protocol to keep flare-ups at bay. Keep an eye on pollen reports and make a note of significant triggers. Avoid exposure to triggers when at all possible. Shower after time outdoors to rinse away pollens and consider air conditioning instead of open windows on days when pollen counts are high. Also, washing all clothes after wearing (instead of re-wearing) can help reduce pollen exposure.

Sweat-induced Folliculitis

All of that open space to run and play is a relief to us all, but it also means we sweat a lot more. Of course, sweat, when combined with bacteria, can cause clogged pores resulting in an embarrassing breakout-like skin condition called folliculitis. So, get into the habit of instituting a proper cleansing routine as part of the evening wind-down. CLn BodyWash or SportWash are both suitable for kids and are designed for skin prone to irritation and folliculitis.

Increased Foot Odor

Even tiny feet can cause BIG foot odor when sweat and bacteria combine. Have your kids wear socks and wash their shoes frequently. Also, consider 1-2 minutes of cleansing feet with CLn to helps neutralize odor-causing bacteria.

Armed with a few quick tips, a healthy appetite for fun, and the right products to protect your skin, Spring is bound to be a fun and sunny season.

 

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

Hear what Eczema Specialist Dr. Aron has to say about causes of Eczema & how he uses CLn

 

Dr. Richard Aron on causes of Eczema
Dr. Richard Aron uses CLn Body Wash and Gentle Shampoo as part of his famous Aron Regimen

As a physician and inventor, I welcome any and all opportunities to discuss health issues with other medical professionals. At the most recent American Academy of Dermatology meeting, I had the chance to sit down with the esteemed South African eczema specialist Dr. Richard Aron. Read on to hear what Dr. Aron of the famous Aron Regimen has to say about causes of eczema and how he uses CLn.

 Dr. Aron’s Beliefs on What Causes Eczema

Dr. Aron has firm beliefs regarding what causes eczema. Read a transcript of our discussion below or watch the video to learn about his point of view.


Dr. Anwar:  We have noticed recently you have added the CLn Body Wash to your regimen. Could explain the reasoning for that for the audience?

Dr. Aron:  Certainly. Fundamental to my regimen and the positive outcomes which it achieves in a great number of patients is the understanding and the perception that the key trigger in active AD [atopic dermatitis] is the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. And it has been established through research by Dr. Nakamura and her team out of the University of Michigan that the delta toxin of Staphylococcus aureus acts as a poison, resulting in degranulation of the mast cells in the skin, causing an outflow of histamine which creates the flares and consequently this is the reason why I use the antibiotic compound to eliminate the Staph.

Now, what does one do to prevent reinoculation by Staphylococcus aureus? I have found that the use of sodium hypochlorite is a very effective preventative agent if used in the correct way. Now, I do not favor the use of raw bleach at all but I am using CLn Body Wash and other [CLn] products, including the Gentle Shampoo, for my patients as a maintenance treatment to reduce the potential for reinfection. One has to treat bleach with caution. Some patients will not tolerate it, but fortunately, I have found that the vast majority of patients in regard to the formulation of CLn products are able to comfortably continue treatment with this particular product range.

Dr. Aron’s Use of CLn for Patients in the Non-Acute Phase of Atopic Dermatitis

Dr. Aron recently added CLn BodyWash and Gentle Shampoo to his Aron Regimen. He prescribes CLn products for patients who have passed through the acute phase of the condition. Read (or watch) how he recommends the cleansers be added to maintenance routines.

Dr. Anwar:  When do you add the CLn range into your regimen?

Dr. Aron:  I do not use it in the acute phase of the inflammation, but as soon as I have obtained what I consider to be adequate control of eczema and the patient’s inflammatory aspects have calmed down by measuring the level of reduction in itch and the improvement in the level of the sleep pattern, I then introduce the product usually on a three times weekly basis.

We hope you’ve found this informational post helpful. We are refreshing CLn Skin Care’s YouTube channel to include additional interviews with doctors that use CLn in their practices. And we’ll have some follow-up interviews with past CLn users posted soon as well. Stay tuned for more video content soon!

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

Hot Tub Folliculitis: Pools aren’t fun when they leave you infected

hot tub folliculitis
Shower right after your soak session to avoid bacterial infection

Spring Break is right around the corner. For many, that means one last ski trip before the season ends. Plenty others will head to indoor water parks, beach destinations and resorts. Enjoying pools and hot tubs is part of what makes vacations relaxing. But to make sure your soak session does not end in an itchy pool rash called hot tub folliculitis, read on…

 What is Hot Tub Folliculitis?

The term refers to the condition called Pseudomonas aeruginosa folliculitis. Doesn’t sound pleasant, does it? Essentially, bacteria from hot tubs, pools, water parks—even contaminated lakes—enters hair follicles and causes inflammation and infection. The resulting rash typically resembles chicken pox in early stages, then advances to look more like pimples. It can be very itchy and painful. And, it can unfortunately spread once acquired. It is commonly found on the torso under areas covered by swimsuits. But it can also occur on any part of the body where bacteria have been allowed to thrive.

 Why Chlorine is Not Enough to Prevent Hot Tub Infection

swimming pool folliculitis
Crowded, warm pools during peak seasons can increase infection risk

We all rely on chlorine and/or bromine to keep water clean in pools and spas. And for the most part, those chemicals do their job. But Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive even in chemicals. This is particularly true if the water is warm. Or if it has not been treated frequently enough or a large number of people  are using the space.

Children and People with Compromised Skin Are More at Risk

Children are typically more susceptible to Pseudomonas aeruginosa folliculitis because they tend to spend more time in water than adults. Anyone with compromised skin is also at an increased risk. Skin can be compromised due to the presence of acne or dermatitis, or because of recent hair removal. Individuals with HIV, leukemia, diabetes or other conditions that weaken the immune system are also more susceptible to hot tub folliculitis than the average population.

Hot Tub Folliculitis Can Last Days—or Years

The telltale bumps usually occur on skin within 72 hours of exposure. If left alone and not scratched, they may resolve on their own in as little as a week. Scratching can worsen outcomes and increase healing time. It is generally recommended to see a doctor if the rash is spreading, has not lessened in 7-10 days or pus is increasing. Antibiotics may be prescribed, as in some instances, the legions can become severely infected. Rare cases do not easily resolve with antibiotics. In these cases, it is very difficult to completely eradicate the rash. I have met individuals that have struggled with the condition in excess of 10 years! Although the rash is not contagious via skin-to-skin contact, it spreads readily on affected individuals. When one area is under control, another area may become infected.

Hot Tub Folliculitis: Prevention Tips

Vacation isn’t vacation without a dip in the pool or spa. And for many kids, swimming is the highlight of the trip. So here are our top 5 tips to avoid bringing home an icky pool rash as a souvenir:

  1. Ask pool/spa personnel if the chlorine and pH levels of water are tested daily, and more frequently if more people are in the water during peak seasons.
  2. If any breaks in the skin are present, consider abstaining from swimming until skin is healed. Also consider scheduling hair removal a week prior to your trip to allow irritation to fade.
  3. Don’t stay in wet bathing suits after swimming. Swimsuits should be removed and washed to reduce bacteria.
  4. Shower as soon as possible after swimming. CLn BodyWash and CLn SportWash are designed for skin prone to infection. They are tough on microbes but gentle on skin. The mild formulas can be used daily on children 6+ months and are also suitable for adults. Watch dermatologist Dr. Herron describe how he uses CLn for his folliculitis patients.
  5. Pay attention to your instincts. If biofilm (scum) is present in hot tubs, it is a good indicator that the water is not clean enough. Likewise, if pools are very crowded and warm, know that bacteria counts are likely elevated. Request that water be tested again. And don’t be shy about asking follow up questions. If you have any doubts about the cleanliness of the water, consider another activity.

These tips should help ensure that your skin stays rash-free on vacation. And just in time for Spring Break, we’ve just launched a new On-The-Go 3.0 oz Body Wash. It is perfect for your travel bag. Also, check out this post for tips on how CLn can help with hair removal prep, mani/pedi hygiene, bug bites and more!

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

CLn’s Recap: 2018 American Academy of Dermatology Convention

CLn Skin Care once again attended the American Academy of Dermatology convention . Thought leaders and esteemed physicians gather at the meeting to provide valuable information on groundbreaking research and the latest updates in patient care. Here’s a quick recap of the AAD convention 2018 and CLn’s role in it.

CLn’s Role at the AAD Convention

We had a wonderful time at the American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting in San Diego this past weekend. We were able to speak with many doctors using our products in their practices and others who are excited to start providing CLn. Thank you to everyone who stopped by our booth!

Posted by CLn Skin Care on Tuesday, February 20, 2018

 

CLn Skin Care was honored to be an exhibitor at the meeting and to have the opportunity to educate health care professionals about the benefits of therapeutic cleansing with CLn. Cleansing should almost always be the first step in dealing with compromised skin, but many cleansers are harsh or ineffective. We received very positive feedback at the American Academy of Dermatology Convention  from doctors that were discovering our product for the first time. They were intrigued with CLn’s patented sodium hypochlorite formula, and especially with the fact that CLn is tough on the microbes that can lead to unwanted conditions, but is gentle on skin.

We heard from many dermatologists that they use CLn themselves, and often recommend us to patients. In addition, we even had the opportunity to meet with and discuss skin health with notable dermatologists such as:

We’ll be updating our website soon with more video interviews and new content from the meeting.

Other Meetings for CLn

CLn also attended the Masters of Pediatric Dermatology meeting in March. We are committed to educating healthcare professionals and consumers alike about the role of therapeutic cleansing. We are proud to be a safe, effective product available for use by anyone 6+ months and older. And we want to make sure that anyone and everyone that can benefit from therapeutic cleansing has the opportunity to use CLn.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

What are Bacterial Biofilm in Skin Infections?

Continuing our New Year’s series about the importance of cleansing and moisturizing in self care, today we’ll dive into bacterial biofilm. We’ll tell you what it is and what it means for the health of your skin. Also, we’ll tell you what you should do about it. Read on!

What is Biofilm?

Biofilm builds vast networks
Think of biofilm as a neighborhood of bacteria establishing itself on your skin

We’re familiar with bacteria as a concept–it’s a fact of life and exists everywhere. If you think of bacteria as individual houses, biofilm is the subdivision they build when they want to create a community to make themselves more resilient and likely to survive. They do this by creating an extracellular substance (slime made of sugar units) that increases their chance of survival against intrusion. This community strength means they’re harder for us to eliminate with antibiotics and other treatments at our disposal. In fact, 80% of human infections are associated with biofilm, but it is difficult to detect.

Where does Biofilm live?

Biofilm can form within a 6-12 hours on virtually any object, and it thrives in wet environments. Biofilm grows on surfaces like those found in showers and gyms and on objects like kitchen utensils, animal, plant, or human tissue–and even medical devices like pacemakers and joint implants. Examples of biofilm you’d be familiar with are dental plaque and pond scum. However, biofilm can also be invisible to the human eye.

Why does Biofilm matter?

Your skin naturally protects you from infection when it is intact. But skin becomes susceptible when an accident or irritation turns into a wound. Biofilm can cause acne and Staph infections to become chronic issues rather than temporary annoyances. Patients with a severe infection will likely need ongoing antibiotics and other treatments that may take significant time to be effective.

Who needs to pay attention to Biofilm and Risk of Skin Infections?

If you deal with frequent skin irritations, arm yourself with the knowledge around how to prevent biofilm buildup. The below three audiences, in particular, should take special care.

Athletes
If you play a contact sport or any sport that makes you work up a good sweat, thorough hygiene practices are important to protect your skin from infection. Shower within one hour of a workout and keep your clothes and gear clean and dry. If one waits to shower, the small number of bacteria present after a workout can grow from single units to colonies of bacteria that are shielded by a protective slime layer. Thereafter, they become much harder to remove and can be a breeding ground for bacteria to multiply rapidly.

Teenagers and Adults with Oily Skin
If you have oily skin, you are more prone to an infection at the hair follicle. Use a cleanser that targets the bacteria where it lives and a moisturizer that balances your skin after you’ve cleansed.

Eczema Patients
For those of you with eczema, you’re all too familiar with complicated treatments, lotions and medications often needed to control symptoms. Continue with your prescribed plan and arm yourself with effective cleansers, such as CLn BodyWash. Also, try as hard as possible not to scratch flares. Resulting abrasions are like throwing the doors wide open at a house party for biofilm.

What are other steps for prevention of Biofilm in skin infection?

The best course of action for biofilm infection prevention lies in keeping your skin clean and dry. Look for a cleanser like CLn BodyWash that is tough on microbes, but gentle on skin. CLn BodyWash is a sodium hypochlorite wash created in partnership with dermatologists especially for skin prone to irritations, rashes and infection. CLn SportWash is also recommended for use post-workout even for those without active breaks in the skin.

Another wise move is to think before you share. Biofilm germs can transfer from bars of soap, hats, sport equipment, bathtubs—you get the gist. We all are prone to have biofilm, but we don’t want to share others’ biofilm.

Also, think of your skin as a protective barrier designed to keep biofilm out of your body. Any breaks in skin allow those biofilm subdivisions to annex more land, metaphorically speaking. So, are your hands cracking in the dry, cold January air? Apply moisturizer to help repair the barrier. New gym shoes causing blisters? Break them in slowly to avoid popped blisters that result in open wounds.

What else can be done about biofilm?

Studies are being conducted to learn more about the molecular mechanisms that cause biofilm formation, why they grow, and why they’re able to resist common treatments like some antibiotics. A better understanding will significantly improve the resources available to healthcare providers to combat biofilm-related infection and will improve the health of patients. But continue to wash up! And don’t forget to give your nails a good scrubbing. Bacteria can breed under them, transfer to skin, and allow biofilm subdivisions to grow.

We hope this article has been helpful. Look for more health-related articles from CLn’s blog this month.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

Expert Answers to Hand Eczema FAQs

 

Peeling and redness are common symptoms of hand eczema
Photo credit: nationaleczema.org

Eczema of the hands can be particularly painful and difficult to manage. Also, sufferers may feel self-conscious or have to refrain from everyday activities during flares. Hand eczema is frequently posted about on Facebook eczema support groups, and is a common source of questions we receive at CLn Skin Care. So, we compiled a list of frequently asked questions about eczema of the hands, and Dr. Mark Jackson provided expert answers:

QUESTION: What causes eczema on the hands?

Eczema simply means dermatitis or dry, red, itchy, irritated skin. It can be caused by things that irritate the skin or by things that cause allergy or contact dermatitis. It is also seen in people with a history of atopic dermatitis, which is a condition where patients don’t have a normal skin barrier and they are not able to use products that people with normal skin can use.

QUESTION: Who suffers from hand eczema more commonly?

Patients with atopic dermatitis or people who are washing their hands constantly or working with harsh, irritating chemicals experience more hand eczema.

QUESTION: What makes hand eczema worse? What ingredients or activities should be avoided by sufferers?

Constant washing/drying without following by moisturizers, exposure to irritating chemicals, winter weather or anything people might be allergic to can cause or worsen an eczema flare.

QUESTION: What ingredients or activities should be avoided by sufferers?

Avoid fragrance-containing cleansers and lotions. Lotions have a higher alcohol content than creams or ointments so they are best  avoided for general moisturizing in patients with severe hand eczema. Also, irritating chemicals like bleach and other caustic agents should be strictly avoided.

QUESTION: What can help manage hand eczema?

Good moisturizing techniques with high quality emollient creams and ointments that are fragrance-free can really help. As can avoiding harsh washes and antibiotic cleansers such as the leave-on hand sanitizers. Soapless liquid cleansers tend to be gentle and get the best result.

QUESTION: What role does cleansing play in managing the condition?

Good cleansing protects from bacterial overgrowth, which is common in the damaged skin of eczema patients.

We hope these answers help you to better manage your hand eczema. We encourage you to use gentle, effective cleansers on your hands whenever and wherever possible, and to seek the care of a dermatologist if your hand eczema worsens.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

A Time for Reflection and Giving Thanks

When we launched CLn Skin Care a few years ago, our mission was to improve people’s lives by inventing easy-to-use, gentle therapeutic cleansers—unlike any other cleanser system on the market. I had had my own health scare. And through it I realized that many more people than myself needed a better way to cleanse compromised skin and skin prone to infection. Our goal at the time felt lofty. We were trying to build and introduce an entirely new product category called “Therapeutic Cleansing.”

Luckily, we were able to partner with a small group of leading edge scientists and dermatologists in the development and testing of CLn products. We created a whole line up of products designed to gently, but effectively, cleanse compromised skin. I will be forever grateful for the collaboration and genius minds that helped make CLn a reality.

We were also fortunate to attract forward thinking doctors to sample CLn products to their patients. Word about our gentle, therapeutic cleansers quickly spread. Soon there was enough demand to begin selling CLn products online. We were not surprised by the reaction, as we knew we were offering something truly valuable and unique. But to see doctors and patients alike rally behind our products filled us with gratitude. It also gave us the motivation to make sure that more doctors and patients discovered how CLn’s line of therapeutic cleansers can truly change lives.

As we reflect on the past few years—and this year, in particular—we are incredibly thankful for the difference CLn is making in people’s lives.

CLn is now:

  • Used in medical settings throughout the US for thousands of patients with compromised or troubled skin
  • Distributed worldwide and recommended to Dr. Aron’s eczema patients
  • Endorsed by team physicians for use by professional athletes needing a cleanser that is tough on microbes and gentle on skin
  • Recognized by the National Eczema Association

We are incredibly proud and grateful for what CLn Skin Care is accomplishing. And we are tremendously thankful for the support we receive from doctors and patients alike. We wish all of you a healthy, happy Thanksgiving.

With gratitude,

Azam  Anwar, MD

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

Understanding Pseudofolliculitis barbae: An Advanced Course in Folliculitis

Pseudofolliculitis Barbae is common in men of African descent

In the second installment of CLn Skin Care’s blog series on folliculitis, we’re covering Pseudofolliculitis barbae. The condition, also known as “barber’s itch,” can be a lifelong struggle, often resulting in painful bumps. If left untreated, scarring can result. We’ve asked skin expert Mark Jackson, MD to answer frequently asked questions regarding this condition. Read on to learn more.

QUESTION: What is Pseudofolliculitis barbae?

https://forefrontdermatology.com/doctor/j-mark-jackson-md/
Mark Jackson, MD is a practicing dermatologist at Forefront Dermatology

Pseudofolliculitis barbae, or “PB or PFB, is a condition that involves the beard/neck area and occasionally the scalp. It is an inflammation around the hair follicles that causes small bumps that can become irritated and occasionally infected. It also makes it hard to shave or cut the hair in those areas due to the irritation that is present.

QUESTION: What causes Pseudofolliculitis barbae?

PB is caused by coarse and/or curly hairs. The curl of the hair can make it difficult for the hair to exit through the follicle opening, thus creating a bump, an ingrown hair and more inflammation. Chronic manipulation, such as shaving or scrubbing, creates worsening of the condition. While plucking helps remove the hair, it creates another issue as the new hair is unable to get through the opening due to the inflammation that is present.

QUESTION: How does PB impact a sufferer? 

These bumps can be painful, become infected and can create secondary scarring. Sometimes the condition can be so severe that it creates significant scarring and loss of hair in the areas.

QUESTION: How do you treat Pseudofolliculitis barbae?

PB is treated with good hair grooming techniques, and by avoiding plucking or irritating the already inflamed bumps. When shaving or cutting the hair, it is best to leave the length above the skin until the inflammation has resolved, so as not to create another ingrown hair. Topical antibiotics and anti-inflammatory creams or washes can be helpful, as can oral antibiotics in cases where the areas have become infected. Laser hair removal is also helpful as it works at the root cause.

QUESTION: What role does cleansing play in managing the condition?

Proper cleansing techniques help to decrease bacterial overgrowth in the affected area, and to decrease secondary infections. Good cleansers with some antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties also help to control the flares of this chronic condition and to treat active outbreaks. 

 

We hope you’ve found these expert answers on Pseudofolliculitis barbae helpful. CLn Acne Cleanser and CLn Shampoo are both suitable for use with this condition. Don’t forget to subscribe to our blog, as we’ll cover other forms of folliculitis and many more skin conditions in upcoming months.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.

Eczema Tips for Temperature Dips

October is Eczema Awareness Month. It is also the month weather transitions from warm to cool for Northern states. Changes in temperatures often require changes to eczema management routines. So check out these quick tips to stay comfortable even when the temperature dips…

1. Keep Showers & Baths Short and Tepid

Long or hot bathing sessions dry out skin, and should be avoided. This is especially true in the winter months when dry, cold air can further deplete skin of moisture.

2. Don’t Skip Showers

According to dermatologist Fred Ghali, MD, of Pediatric Dermatology of North Texas, “Frequency of bathing is a worthwhile discussion point with atopic patients. Many eczema sufferers tend to bathe less frequently in cooler months, believing that bathing dries out skin. We share with our patients that daily routine cleansing and moisturizing maintains a healthy skin barrier. Since bacteria such as Staphylococcal aureus can often trigger or intensify the severity of the eczema, we recommend regular bathing throughout the year as a maintenance step in keeping these bacteria in check.”

3. Switch Your Cleanser

CLn BodyWash is an excellent cleanser for eczema-prone skin. But did you know that CLn Gentle Shampoo contains moisturizing glycerin and can actually be used as a body wash during winter’s drying months?

4. Upgrade from a Lotion to a Cream

Drier air and stiffer winds mean skin needs more moisture. Thicker formulas are more occlusive and can help better protect skin.

5. Load Purses and Pockets with Moisturizer

Moisturizing just morning and night—even with cream—might not be often enough if drier air triggers eczema flares.  Additionally, if your child suffers from eczema, don’t forget to send moisturizer to school with them.  Just make sure to apply lotion to clean skin.

6. Avoid Wool or Scratchy Materials

Although cozy and warm, wool can irritate the skin of eczema sufferers. So, opt for high quality cotton when possible, as it is less likely to irritate sensitive skin.

7. Keep Cotton Mittens Handy

Even if October seems too early to break out the mittens, keep a pair at the ready. Eczema on the hands can cause greater sensitivity to cold temperatures. Additionally, mittens protect hands from drying winds.

8. Wash Mittens and Hats Weekly

Frequently worn items like hats and mittens can rapidly accumulate bacteria that can enter breaks in the skin of eczema sufferers. Hence, washing gear thoroughly—and allowing it to completely dry—is a simple way to reduce exposure to harmful microbes.

9. Invest in a Humidifier

Dry, indoor air leaches skin moisture  and can exacerbate eczema. Therefore, consider getting a humidifier for bedrooms if you notice more symptoms in cooler months. Be sure to clean the filter frequently.

10. Watch Out for Reactions to Fabric Softener

Static is a fact of life in colder, drier months. Due to this, many people use fabric softener to reduce static, not realizing it coats clothing in ingredients that can trigger eczema flairs. Since these ingredients, like fragrances and additives, can do more harm than good, fabric softener is best avoided unless you are certain it does not trigger flairs.

We hope you’ve learned more about managing eczema from these tips. And don’t forget to subscribe to our blog to have new content delivered right to your inbox.

Disclaimer: The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not constitute medical advice. The information, graphics, and images on this website are not intended to substitute diagnosis and/or treatment by a medical professional. These products have been clinically tested and proven to be safe for intended use. Always seek the advice of a physician with any questions you may have regarding a specific medical condition.